/* WP-Cache Config Sample File See wp-cache.php for author details. */ $wpsc_version = 169; $wpsc_last_post_update = 1554801314; //Added by WP-Cache Manager $cache_time_interval = 600; //Added by WP-Cache Manager if ( ! defined('WPCACHEHOME') ) define( 'WPCACHEHOME', WP_CONTENT_DIR . "/plugins/wp-super-cache/" ); //Added by WP-Cache Manager $cache_compression = 0; // Super cache compression $cache_enabled = true; $super_cache_enabled = true; $cache_max_time = 1800; //Added by WP-Cache Manager //$use_flock = true; // Set it true or false if you know what to use $cache_path = WP_CONTENT_DIR . '/cache/'; $file_prefix = 'wp-cache-'; $ossdlcdn = 0; // Array of files that have 'wp-' but should still be cached $cache_acceptable_files = array( 'wp-comments-popup.php', 'wp-links-opml.php', 'wp-locations.php' ); $cache_rejected_uri = array('wp-.*\\.php', 'index\\.php'); $cache_rejected_user_agent = array ( 0 => 'bot', 1 => 'ia_archive', 2 => 'slurp', 3 => 'crawl', 4 => 'spider', 5 => 'Yandex' ); $cache_rebuild_files = 1; // Disable the file locking system. // If you are experiencing problems with clearing or creating cache files // uncommenting this may help. $wp_cache_mutex_disabled = 1; // Just modify it if you have conflicts with semaphores $sem_id = 5419; if ( '/' != substr($cache_path, -1)) { $cache_path .= '/'; } $wp_cache_mobile = 0; $wp_cache_preload_interval = 600; $cache_schedule_type = 'interval'; //Added by WP-Cache Manager $wp_cache_preload_posts = 0; $wp_cache_preload_on = 0; $wp_cache_preload_taxonomies = 0; $wp_cache_preload_email_me = 0; $wp_cache_preload_email_volume = 'none'; $wpsc_save_headers = 0; $cache_schedule_interval = 'hourly'; //Added by WP-Cache Manager ?> The Conflicted Confectioner http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com Wishing confections had no calories . . . Sat, 23 Sep 2017 19:43:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 Pumpkin-caramel ganache in milk-chocolate shells http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/10/29/pumpkin-caramel-ganache-in-milk-chocolate-shells/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/10/29/pumpkin-caramel-ganache-in-milk-chocolate-shells/#respond Tue, 29 Oct 2013 22:10:18 +0000 http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/?p=73 Pumpkin-caramel chocolates

Pumpkin-caramel ganache in milk-chocolate shells with dark-chocolate bottoms. I was tempted to Photoshop out all the cracks and fissures, but the unadulterated photo shows what can happen to your molded chocolates if you bang the molds too harshly when trying to release the chocolates.
Recipe from Peter Greweling’s Chocolates and Confections.

Empty chocolate molds painted with colored cocoa butter.

The cavities were painted with colored cocoa butter and some colored (and edible) powder.

Molds filled with ganache

On the left are molds filled with an improvised pumpkin ganache that was of the perfect consistency for piping and self-leveling. On the right, the molds were filled with the pumpkin-caramel ganache, which could have been looser for shell-filling purposes. Overall it worked fine but I ran out of the original ganache after filling three out of four molds, thus the improvised ganache batch. I could have filled these molds even more, judging by the thickness of the bottom part of the shell, which is evident in the top photo.

molded chocolates with cracked shells

The not-all-that-fragile chocolate shells cracked before they were released. This is not the fault of the chocolate but the fault of impatient chocolatiers who rapped the still-full molds with great force against the countertop. This photo represents the worst of the bunch, most chocolates suffered superficial, if unsightly, cracks. By the way, the harsh treatment cracked the shells, but did not help release the chocolates. Finally, after basking for about 30 minutes in the freezer, the chocolates released as they were supposed to. But the damage had already been done.

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Chi-chi Mallomars http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/10/10/chi-chi-mallomars/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/10/10/chi-chi-mallomars/#respond Thu, 10 Oct 2013 01:47:16 +0000 http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/?p=68 mallomar-like confections

Pet d’ange. You could also call them chi-chi Mallomars. Recipe from Peter Greweling’s Chocolates and Confections

shortbread rounds

Golden brown shortbread rounds, about 1.25 inches each.

marshmallow globs on shortbread rounds

Globs of too-loose marshmallow lounge on the shortbread rounds, threatening to eclipse them altogether.

Cross-section close-up

Cross-section close-up of “pet d’ange.” With shortbread and without. And yes, that is chocolate bloom on the chocolate disks used in the non-cookie version.

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Please don’t say they taste like Mounds bars http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/09/25/please-dont-say-they-taste-like-mounds-bars/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/09/25/please-dont-say-they-taste-like-mounds-bars/#respond Wed, 25 Sep 2013 02:36:30 +0000 http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/?p=40 dish of coconut squares

Coconut squares

Confections-making season has finally arrived! The long, hot, humid summer of 2013 was finally behind me, so with renewed aplomb I dived into Peter Greweling’s Coconut Squares from his book, Chocolates and Confections, 2nd edition. I do not remember why I chose this recipe, though I had been anticipating making the squares for some time. I bought the dessicated coconut about a month before attempting the recipe, and about two months before bought several bottles of inverted sugar and four 15-inch caramel rulers from JBPrince. A satisfying splurge, indeed. (The caramel rulers, not the chocolate squares.)

The procedure was rather straightforward: cook some sugar syrup, moisten the coconut with the sugar syrup, then cook up a lot of sugar syrup, and add that syrup, plus some frappe (or marshmallow creme) to the coconut. Mix it all together well, then spread into a 12×12-inch frame. Let set. Coat one side of the slab with bittersweet chocolate. When the chocolate sets, flip the slab and cut into 1-inch squares. Dip each square in tempered chocolate, add a little swooshy-swoosh flourish with a dipping fork, then sprinkle on a few strands of dessicated coconut.

They looked great and tasted pretty darn good. I brought some into work and received a few “Fabulous! Tastes just like a Mounds bar!” comments. Yikes! If I wanted to present substandard, cheap confections to my colleagues I would have hopped across the street to CVS to get a sack of Fun-Size Mounds instead of spending much of my weekend and spare change creating coconut squares.

In the interest of understanding and perfecting my craft, I did a Mounds – homemade-coconut-square taste test.

The coconut-filling taste was almost the same, but homemade had brighter flavor. The chocolate of Mounds bar was soft, not snappy, and was a dull, ugly brown with machine-engineered “waves.” And the chocolate has a wimpy flat taste. The chocolate on the homemade specimen, of course, had a beautiful shine and snap — and a rich chocolate taste.

Not a big fan either way, though; I prefer rich, creamy, dreamy fillings. Wish I could remember why I chose to make these to begin with.

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Orange Truffles, Citrus Confit, and Chocolate-dipped Candied Orange Peel http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/05/21/orange-truffles/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/05/21/orange-truffles/#respond Wed, 22 May 2013 01:50:27 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=525 Orange truffles

After they were dipped in chocolate, these orange truffles were rolled across a cooling rack to give them spikes reminiscent of chef Anne Burrell’s hair.

I chose Orange Truffles for the first recipe to try in Peter Greweling’s book Chocolates and Confections: Formula, theory and technique for the artisan chocolatier for two reasons: one, they were truffles and therefore within my comfort zone (in theory), and, two, I had plenty of Grand Marnier on hand.

The first snag in the recipe was the “orange confit, diced 3mm/⅛ in” in the ingredient list. I didn’t know there was such a thing; was it just a fancy way of saying candied orange peel in the syrup it was cooked in? That turned out to be the case. I used Carole Bloom’s recipe for Candied Orange Peel from her book Truffles, Candies, and Confections; the recipe called for Grand Marnier as part of the syrup — an unexpected bonus. The candied orange peel was lovely. I added some lime and lemon peels to the mixture as well. The lemon peel turned out nice and chewy; the lime peel a bit tough. Anywho, I reserved twice the amount needed of the confit . . .

Orange confit is, basically, candied orange peel in the sugar syrup it was cooked in.

Orange confit is, basically, candied orange peel in the sugar syrup it was cooked in.

. . . then rolled the rest of the candied peels in granulated sugar.

Sugared orange peel

Strips of candied orange peel drying up a bit after being rolled in sugar.

The truffles were creamy and citrusy, but the success of the finished product was hard-won, for the candying and coating of the orange peel took over three hours, and the ganache was a bitch to make. You see, the chocolate disks barely melted in the hot cream, so I melted everything further over a bain marie. After the chocolate melted, the ganache refused to emulsify. After beating the heck out of it, letting it rest, beating the heck out of it again, letting it rest, etc., the ganache finally came together but it was then too solid to pipe so I had to use my Zeroll #100 disher to portion out the ganache. Turned out, this resulted in truffles twice as big as Greweling intended. Luckily, I caught this in time so I was able to cut each portion in half before rolling them into balls.

Perhaps the best part of all this was I now had plenty of candied orange peel to dip. Fresh, sweet, citrusy peel meets snappy bittersweet chocolate. YUM YUM YUM YUM YUM.

Orange peel dipped in chocolate

Chocolate-dipped orange peel.

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White-Chocolate Citrus Ganache in White-Chocolate Shells http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/21/white-chocolate-citrus-ganache-in-shells/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/21/white-chocolate-citrus-ganache-in-shells/#respond Mon, 21 Jan 2013 17:58:57 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=442 Molded chocolates, white chocolate

White-chocolate-citrus ganache in white-chocolate shells. The candies look a little more yellow in the photo than they really were. (Click on image to see larger photo.)

Though molded chocolates are among my favorite types of confections, I’ve gotta say that they’re a big pain in the arse to make at home. Everything is hurry-up-and-wait, extremely messy, and sometimes seemingly impossible for anyone with fewer than four hands.

But I never regret making them — and I will probably make many more.

This episode’s chocolates feature a white-chocolate-citrus ganache in a white-chocolate shell. I’ve been wanting to try a citrus ganache for quite some time, so I took the gist of Dede Wilsons’s citrus truffles recipe from her aptly named book, Truffles, and applied it to an oh-so-gently adapted version of Liz Gutman and Jen King’s ganache from their book The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook.

And so, the white-chocolate citrus ganache went something like this (sorry I didn’t weigh the citrus zests):

  • 550 grams (about 19.5 ounces) white chocolate, chopped (I used Cacao Barry, though I’m not fond of it and will probably never buy it again. Tastes like chalk.)
  • 225 grams (1 cup) heavy whipping cream
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh grapefruit zest
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh tangerine zest
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lemon zest
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lime zest
  • 45 grams (2 Tablespoons) light corn syrup
  • 1 gram (1/4 teaspoon) fine sea salt

I tend to worry about the ganache for molded chocolates being too thick to self-level in the molds, so I always add a little less chocolate than the ganache recipes specify, even if it’s a recipe for ganache destined for molded chocolates. Even with a slightly reduced amount of chocolate in this case (the Liddabit recipe had called for 20 ounces), by the time I was piping the second mold the ganache started to mound a bit. Once the filling starts to mound, it’s harder to judge just how much room is really left in the mold for the sealing chocolate. Of course, one of the best ways to learn that you’re overfilling the molds is to inspect the filling at eye level — if you see any filling sticking out, you’ve overfilled. Using the eye-level peek a little too late in the process, I discovered that at least half of the cavities were slightly overfilled. Stubbornly, I soldiered on. Long story short: the ganache could have used even less chocolate or a tablespoon or two more cream. Oh well.

As a filling proper, though, the ganache is great. I’ll always prefer a creamier ganache than what I have in paw, but I was happy with the creaminess of this ganache within the white chocolate shell, at least on day one. It’s day three now, so I should try another!!

Taste-wise, the ganache did have a mild and fresh citrus-y taste, but I wish it were stronger. Dede Wilson’s original formula included some Boyajian citrus oils, which, said Wilson, could be replaced by doubling the amount of each type of zest (I actually tripled each amount for the recipe above). But after reading a lukewarm review of the oils, I had decided not to bother to track them down. Maybe I should have given them a try after all.

Cacao Barry’s “Blanc Satin” 29.2% cocoa butter white chocolate was a disappointment in both flavor and viscosity. Flavor was all but nonexistent — I expect at least a little bit of vanilla in a white chocolate, but could barely detect any here. And, as a molding chocolate, it’s simply too thick to work with at “working” temperature — I must have added up to 4 tablespoons of Mycryo (powdered cocoa butter) to my four pounds of melted chocolate. This worked well for the shells, which, after three minutes of setting were a perfect thickness — but sealing the molds took a lot longer than I ever thought imaginable — up to 45 minutes for the seal to set, possibly because I did something wrong while tempering. Fortunately, this lag did give me extra time to patch the bottoms of the chocolates for which I had overfilled the ganache. These turned out to be not-so-nice-to-look at from the bottom, but from the top they look fine, though most of the patched bottoms do not sit perfectly flush on a plate.

Full disclosure: the tempering chocolate was about one-sixth Guittard’s “Creme Francais” 31% cocoa butter white chocolate, as I had, thankfully, run out of the Cacao Barry. Actually, for future white-chocolate shells, I wonder if I should go as high up the cocoa-butter scale as possible, to, say, Valhrona’s “Ivoire” 40.5% cocoa butter, or at least E. Guittard’s “Soie Blanche” 35% cocoa butter. Unfortunately the Soie Blanche does not come in 11-lb boxes like the Creme Francais does — I’ll probably never be willing to commit to the 25-lb box. Fortunately Chocosphere will repackage the Soie Blanche into 2.2-lb. bags. 🙂

So, all that’s left to cover here is the coloring of the shells. By far I think using a glove-covered fingertip to smoosh colored cocoa butter around the mold before filling it with chocolate works the best, at least this time around. Using a small paintbrush to add the color can work, as I tried in the heart and flower-shaped molds, but you have to get the cocoa butter at just the right thickness for smooth painting without any too-thin color pooling in the bottoms of the cavities. It’s a very short time period within which this can work. The fingertip-application is much easier (you can always re-smoosh if the color starts to pool in the center), and usually looks pretty darned cool.

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Milk-Chocolate Ganache in Bittersweet Chocolate Shells http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/12/milk-chocolate-ganache-in-shells/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/12/milk-chocolate-ganache-in-shells/#respond Sat, 12 Jan 2013 21:49:12 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=371 My latest molded-chocolate practice session was fraught with problems, but the two-toned shell seemed to work out OK. Here, a milk-chocolate ganache was piped into a bittersweet chocolate shell with milk-chocolate striping. (Click on image to see larger photo.)

My latest molded-chocolate practice session was fraught with problems, but the two-toned shell seemed to work out OK. Here, a milk-chocolate ganache was piped into a bittersweet chocolate shell with milk-chocolate striping. (Click on image to see larger photo.)

My latest molded-chocolate practice session left me with over 100 thick-shelled chocolates with too little ganache inside them, an estimated two pounds of wasted chocolate, and complete exhaustion. A quick run-thru of notes and lessons learned before I collapse:

  • Valhrona’s Tanariva milk chocolate has strong caramel undertones (overtones?), so it’s not a great choice for couverture, I think, because it will compete with most fillings and centers, except maybe those of “plain” chocolate ganache, or something salty or smoky. Yet I had a nearly full 6-lb bag of the stuff, so thought I’d make a plain chocolate ganache to fill bittersweet chocolate shells.
     
  • The Tanariva was very interesting to work with — upon stirring the melted chocolate with the cream, the mixture looked like caramel, smelled like caramel, and had a loose but caramel-like consistency.
     
  • Guittard 58% turned out to be too thick for molding. I should research best couvertures for molded chocolate work, or good percentages of cocoa butter to add if chocolate is too thick at working temperature.
     
  • If the chocolate is really thick when filling the molds, invert the molds IMMEDIATELY after filling them — don’t wait! A few of the mold’s cavities got such a thick chocolate shell they were essentially solid chocolate when done — not room for even a microdrop of ganache.
     
  • Allow at least 1 pound of tempered chocolate PER MOLD — make that 1.5 pounds. The 1.5 pounds prescribed by Liz Gutman and Jen King in their book The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook for THREE to FOUR molds barely filled two. Grr. I should have known better.
     
  • The size of the scraper should be close to the width of the mold you’ll be scraping. If using, say, a 15-inch icing spatula, the whole length of it can get covered with dripping chocolate, leaving a lot of dripped chocolate on the counter if your mold is only 6 inches wide.
     
  • Use as large a bowl as possible when pouring unused chocolate from molds back into bowl. This sounds obvious but I never think of it until it’s too late.
     
  • Have several clean scrapers on hand. And you can never have enough ladles. I’d say one ladle per mold is safest. One ladle for every two molds at the very least.
     
  • Using a large silicone mat to “protect” your countertop is not a good idea. For something that’s supposed to be non-stick, pans, parchment, and foil will all adhere to it – making sliding things around the countertop impossible. UNLESS it’s the bowl of tempered chocolate that you need to be held in place because you tempered too little chocolate and you’re scraping the ladle against the sides of the bowl trying to get every last bit of chocolate — THEN the bowl slides all over the place. But I digress. The silicone mat is not worth it here — it helps cleanup only a little bit.
     
  • Gotta find a way to create less chocolate waste — from utensils (spoons, spatulas, ladles) alone, I picked off at least eight ounces of chocolate. In the same vein, gotta be less messy with the molds — up to 1/8 inch of chocolate on the outside of the molds is not only wasteful, it makes the molds damned hard to handle and work with.
     
  • Until I have the process of molding chocolates down pat, I should have the steps listed on the wall in big print so I’ll remember to do the little but important things that I gloss over because I’m rushing to keep up with the chocolate — banging on and vibrating the molds are two key steps I often forget, which results in air bubbles on all parts of the shells.
     
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Cashew-Studded English Toffee http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/07/cashew-studded-english-toffee/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/07/cashew-studded-english-toffee/#respond Tue, 08 Jan 2013 02:26:02 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=220 cashew-studded toffee

Chopped toasted cashews were added to a basic English toffee recipe, then dipped in milk or white chocolate and given an outer layer of chopped cashews. (Click on photo to see larger image.)

English toffee is rather easy to make — I based my cashew-loaded version on Carole Bloom’s recipe, but most recipes I’ve found use near-identical formulas. Bloom instructs us to roll the dipped toffee in chopped nuts, coating the piece entirely. I found that to be overkill and decided to have just one side covered with nuts, with a cashew half garnishing the top.

To get the chopped cashews on just one side of the dipped toffee, have a shallow pan filled with toasted chopped cashews (about two to three cups worth) ready to go before tempering the chocolate. Place each freshly dipped toffee piece onto the cashews, gently press a whole cashew onto the top (using this pressure to also press the toffee into the cashew pieces), and let each piece sit until the chocolate is set enough for you to safely move them to another pan. As you take the set toffee pieces off the pan, redistribute the remaining chopped cashews to ensure all subsequent pieces also get a nicely cashewed bottom.

The Carole Bloom recipe I used is from her book Truffles, Candies, and Confections, Ten Speed Press, 2004, p.156-157.

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Elizabeth LaBau’s Peppermint Swirl Marshmallows http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/06/elizabeth-labaus-peppermint-swirl-marshmallows/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/06/elizabeth-labaus-peppermint-swirl-marshmallows/#respond Sun, 06 Jan 2013 20:34:16 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=330 Peppermint swirl marshmallows

The marshmallows have a nice texture and flavor, but getting the swirl right was more difficult than I had thought it would be. (Click on image to see larger photo.)

I do not plan to post the recipe here; see LaBau’s book The Sweet Book of Candy Making, Quarry Press, 2012, p.116-117 for more information.

Elizabeth LaBau’s Peppermint Swirl Marshmallows are a no-frills basic marshmallow recipe with the addition of a marbling effect on the top done with red food coloring and a toothpick.

I had gel food coloring but it was not the type you could “drizzle over the top of the marshmallow in a random pattern.” But I did the best I could. My one regret was I did not block off any time this weekend to temper chocolate and dip these marshmallows — while I was cutting the marshmallows I was thinking, GEE I REALLY WISH I HAD TIME TO DIP THESE IN CHOCOLATE — THEY’D BE AWESOME!! But they’re pretty darned good without any coating. I’ll soon test them in a cup of steaming hot cocoa.

I guess I’ll have to make another batch of marshmallows for dipping in the near future . . .

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White-Chocolate Cappuccino Truffles http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/04/white-chocolate-cappuccino-truffles/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2013/01/04/white-chocolate-cappuccino-truffles/#respond Sat, 05 Jan 2013 03:16:24 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=194  

The white-chocolate-based ganache was so creamy and soft that the truffle centers barely held their shape before they were dipped. (Click on photo for larger image.)

The white-chocolate-based ganache was so creamy and soft that the truffle centers barely held their shape before they were dipped. (Click on photo to see larger image.)

Unable to find a trustworthy cappuccino truffle recipe with a white-chocolate-based ganache (I was trying to please both a coffee lover and a chocolate hater), I decided to adapt truffle goddess Carole Bloom’s cappuccino truffles recipe, which in its original form has a dark-chocolate ganache base.

In my first trial, I used a white-chocolate-to-cream ratio Bloom used in many of her truffle recipes (2.5 pounds white chocolate to 3/4 cup heavy whipping cream) and slightly reduced the prescribed amount of espresso powder, since it no longer had to compete with a bittersweet chocolate.

The ganache in my first trial tasted like yummy coffee ice cream, but I was disappointed by the texture: too stiff. I like my truffles very creamy. So I increased the amount of cream in my second trial and the texture was perfect. The trade-off: the ganache was so soft, even when ice cold, it had to be handled quickly and carefully while rolling and dipping — and even being quick and careful yielded some flatter-than-a-globe shapes. But I didn’t care; I loved them anyway.

Confession: In my first trial, I was lazy and arrogant and assumed I did not need to temper the milk chocolate I was using for decoration. WRONG. Bloomed milk chocolate (and this bloomed very quickly) is not any easier to look at than bloomed dark chocolate.

Recipe source: Adapted from the book Truffles, Candies, & Confections: Techniques and Recipes by Carole Bloom. Ten Speed Press, 2004. p. 45
Yield: About 60 truffles

Ingredients

  • Up to 4 1/2 pounds white chocolate, finely chopped, divided (I used E. Guittard’s Creme Francais [31% cocoa butter].)
  • 3/4 cup + 2 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons instant espresso powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Up to 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 8 ounces milk chocolate

Procedure

  1. Place one pound of the white chocolate in a 2-quart microwave-friendly mixing bowl. In a one-quart saucepan over medium heat, bring the cream to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat, dissolve the espresso powder in 3 tablespoons of the cream, then blend back in with the rest of the cream. Stir in the cinnamon, then pour the cream over the chocolate. Let the cream-chocolate mixture stand for one minute, then stir together with a rubber spatula until smooth. If stubborn bits of unmelted chocolate remain, microwave the mixture for 10- or 15-second intervals, stirring after each interval, until all the chocolate has melted.
  2. Cover the ganache, let cool to room temperature, and chill in the refrigerator until thick but not stiff (2 to 3 hours — no worries about this ganache becoming too stiff!). Or let the ganache sit at cool room temperature for several hours or overnight until thick enough to scoop or pipe.
  3. Line two half-sheet baking sheets with parchment paper. Fit a 12-inch-or-larger pastry bag with a tip with a 1/2-inch opening, or snip a similarly-sized opening at the tip of a disposable pastry bag, and pipe out mounds about one inch in diameter. Or use a small ice-cream scoop (the Zeroll #100 EZ Disher is a perfect size) to form the mounds. Cover the mounds with plastic wrap, or use a half-sheet pan cover if you have one, and chill in the refrigerator until mounds are firm enough to roll, about 6 hours.
  4. Remove the ganache mounds from refrigerator. Add about 2 Tablespoons of the confectioners’ sugar to a sandwich-sized plate; dust your hands with some of the sugar as well. Roll the mounds into balls, dipping mounds into the sugar and adding more sugar to your hands or the plate as necessary to prevent the ganache from sticking to your hands, the parchment, or each other. Work quickly so you don’t overwarm or oversoften the ganache (it may be on the soft side from the get-go). These are, of course, the truffle centers. Cover and refrigerate the centers until firm.
  5. Smoothly line another two half-sheet pans with aluminum foil. Melt — but don’t temper — about 1 pound of the white chocolate. Quickly hand-dip the cold centers in the chocolate and place them on the prepared pans. Return dipped centers to the refrigerator until chocolate is set. (Once the chocolate is set, you can wait several hours, or even day or so if necessary, before proceeding.) Reserve the remaining chocolate for future use.
  6. Remove the pre-dipped truffle centers from the fridge and bring to cool-room temperature. Smoothly line two more baking sheets with aluminum foil, or use acetate sheets to line the sheets. Melt and temper three pounds of the white chocolate and dip each center with a dipping fork, or hand-dip the truffles a second time, making sure that you do not introduce additional flat edges to the truffles as you drop them on the baking sheet. Let set at room temperature, if desired, or proceed immediately to the next step.
  7. Melt and temper the milk chocolate. Using a spoon, parchment cone, or small pastry bag fitted with a thin round tip, drizzle the chocolate over the truffles. Allow drizzle to set at room temperature. After the covering and the drizzle is fully set, place the truffles in candy cups (if desired), then move the truffles to an airtight container, preferably while you’re wearing a thin cotton glove to prevent fingerprints.
  8. Bloom tells us that “in a tightly covered container wrapped in several layers of aluminum foil, the truffles will keep for one month in the refrigerator or two months in the freezer,” though other experts would say that the truffles can keep well at cool room temperature without the need for all that aluminum foil. However they are stored, be sure to bring them to room temperature before eating.
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Carole Bloom’s Chocolate Raspberry Truffles http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2012/12/30/carole-blooms-chocolate-raspberry-truffles/ http://www.conflictedconfectioner.com/2012/12/30/carole-blooms-chocolate-raspberry-truffles/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:01:18 +0000 http://www.kitchenkvetch.com/?p=170 The chocolate raspberry ganache was actually creamier than it looks here—this photo was taken shortly after the truffles were rescued from the fridge. (Click on photo for larger image.)

The chocolate raspberry ganache was actually creamier than it looks here—this photo was taken shortly after the truffles were rescued from the fridge, so the ganache didn’t have a chance to soften much. (Click on photo to see larger image.)

One of the confection cookbooks I’ve had great success with so far is Carole Bloom’s Truffles, Candies, & Confections, especially when it comes to truffles. I’ve tried her milk chocolate truffles, mocha truffles, and chocolate raspberry truffles — all of which yielded truffles of perfect flavor and texture — and adapted her cappuccino truffles for a white-chocolate ganache. Kudos to her for her carefully written, thorough instructions as well.

When I made Bloom’s already-fabulous chocolate-raspberry truffle recipe for the second time, I upped the amount of raspberries slightly, both for convenience — 12-ounce packages of frozen raspberries were easy to find in my area — and for a little extra raspberry zip. I also changed the procedure slightly, adding the step of an initial hand dipping with untempered chocolate. And I upped the amount of chocolate required for dipping and used a colored-white-chocolate drizzle for garnish instead of her originally prescribed cocoa powder.

To incorporate the heated cream into the melting chocolate while making the ganache, Bloom suggests using a whisk, rubber spatula, or immersion blender. I prefer using the spatula because it makes it easier to incorporate the mixture from the sides of the bowl, it won’t get clogged up by a mass of unmelted chocolate like a whisk might, and it is easier to clean than an immersion blender.

Recipe source: Gently adapted from the book Truffles, Candies, & Confections: Techniques and Recipes by Carole Bloom. Ten Speed Press, 2004. p. 46-47
Yield: About 60 truffles

Ingredients

  • 1 (12-ounce) package frozen raspberries — no sugar added, defrosted. Or a generous cup of fresh raspberries.
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • Up to 4 1/2 pounds bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped, divided (I used E. Guittard’s L’Etoile du Premiere 58%.)
  • 3/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tablespoons corn syrup
  • 2 Tablespoons framboise or Chambord (I used Crème de Framboise; I’m not sure how that differs from the prescribed liqueurs.)
  • up to 3/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 8 ounces white chocolate
  • Red oil-based candy coloring (Do not use water-based coloring!)

Procedure

  1. Purée the raspberries in a food processor or blender, then strain the mixture to remove the seeds. Mix the purée with the sugar in a 1-quart saucepan, and cook the mixture over medium heat until it is reduced by half, about 10 to 15 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.
  2. Place one pound of the chocolate in a 2-quart microwave-friendly mixing bowl. In a one-quart saucepan over medium heat, bring the cream to a boil. Pour the cream over the chocolate. Let the cream-chocolate mixture stand for one minute, then stir together with a rubber spatula until smooth. If stubborn bits of unmelted chocolate remain, microwave the mixture for 10- or 15-second intervals, stirring after each interval, until all the chocolate has melted. Add the corn syrup, reduced raspberry purée, and liqueur, and mix thoroughly.
  3. Cover the ganache, let cool to room temperature, and chill in the refrigerator until thick but not stiff (2 to 3 hours). Or let the ganache sit at cool room temperature for several hours or overnight until thick enough to scoop or pipe.
  4. Line two half-sheet baking sheets with parchment paper. Fit a 12-inch-or-larger pastry bag with a tip with a 1/2-inch opening, or snip a similarly-sized opening at the tip of a disposable pastry bag, and pipe out mounds about one inch in diameter. Or use a small ice-cream scoop (the Zeroll #100 EZ Disher is a perfect size) to form the mounds. Cover the mounds with plastic wrap, or use a half-sheet pan cover if you have one, and chill in the refrigerator until mounds are firm enough to roll, about 6 hours.
  5. Remove the ganache mounds from refrigerator. Add about 2 Tablespoons of the cocoa to a sandwich-sized plate; dust your hands with some cocoa powder as well. Roll the mounds into balls, dipping mounds into cocoa and adding more cocoa to your hands or the plate as necessary to prevent the ganache from sticking to your hands, the parchment, or each other. Work quickly enough so you don’t overwarm or oversoften the ganache. These are, of course, the truffle centers. Cover and refrigerate the centers until firm.
  6. Smoothly line another two half-sheet pans with aluminum foil. Melt — but don’t temper — about 1 pound of the bittersweet chocolate. Quickly hand-dip the cold centers in the chocolate and place them on the prepared pans. Return dipped centers to the refrigerator until chocolate is set. (Once the chocolate is set, you can wait several hours, or even day or so if necessary, before proceeding.) Reserve the remaining chocolate for future use.
  7. Remove the pre-dipped truffle centers from the fridge and bring to cool-room temperature. Smoothly line two more baking sheets with aluminum foil, or use acetate sheets to line the sheets. Melt and temper three pounds of the bittersweet chocolate and dip each center with a dipping fork, or hand-dip the truffles a second time, making sure that you do not introduce additional flat edges to the truffles as you drop them on the baking sheet. Let set at room temperature, if desired, or proceed immediately to the next step.
  8. Melt and temper the white chocolate. Add food coloring to the tempered white chocolate a little at a time until you get your desired shade of red. Using a spoon, parchment cone, or small pastry bag fitted with a thin round tip, drizzle the chocolate over the truffles. Allow drizzle to set at room temperature. After the covering and the drizzle is fully set, place the truffles in candy cups (if desired), then move the truffles to an airtight container, preferably while you’re wearing a thin cotton glove to prevent fingerprints.
  9. Bloom tells us that “in a tightly covered container wrapped in several layers of aluminum foil, the truffles will keep for one month in the refrigerator or two months in the freezer,” though other experts would say that the truffles can keep well at cool room temperature without the need for all that aluminum foil. However they are stored, be sure to bring them to room temperature before eating.
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